Need Better Results From Your Subject Matter Experts?

December 12, 2017 10:23 by Dana Peters
At Mondo Learning Solutions we’re committed to helping our clients grow, which is why we try to pass along the best and latest resources to help in your business. Our friends and colleagues at Chicago-based Turpin Communication recently released a new book, “Effective SMEs: A Trainer’s Guide for Helping Subject Matter Experts Facilitate Learning”. This book is one you will want to have in your library. We regularly work with subject matter experts (SMEs) in the virtual classroom, which has both its advantages and disadvantages. As Turpin suggests, SMEs do bring credibility and relevance to the classroom, but that is often not enough to deliver an effective session. For many SMEs the training environment is unfamiliar terrain. They are often authorities on a particular topic, not on adult learning and aren’t necessarily familiar with effective facilitation techniques.  I like this book specifically because it comes from a place of experience. Authors Dale Ludwig and Greg Owen-Boger leverage decades of work helping presenters, instructional designers, and subject matter experts become better communicators. They use detailed and relatable workplace scenarios plucked directly from their own experiences to assist readers in learning about a variety of learning situations. The book serves as a blueprint for managing SME-led training with the underlying premise that successful training stems from a place of communication and an understanding of everyone’s role.It also digs into best practices for coaching your SMEs. It’s available for purchase on Amazon.com and most bookstores, and the first chapter is available for free on the Association for Talent Development website. Give it a look.

Counting My Blessings

November 15, 2016 10:00 by Dana Peters
Where has the time gone? The holiday season is right around the corner, and before we know it, we will all be staring down the barrel of a brand new 2017. Mondo Learning Solutions is nearing our sixth anniversary in business, and like so many others, I find myself reflecting this holiday season on everything I have to be thankful for.First and foremost, I am thankful for our loyal clients; both for the work they give us and for the referrals they send our way. Our business would be nothing without them, and we look forward to continuing to serve their needs. Secondly, I am thankful for the Mondo team. Without our team of virtual producers, facilitators, instructional designers, virtual platform experts, writers, and assistants, all of whom also wear multiple hats, we wouldn’t be able to provide the level of service our clients have come to expect. I’ve come to realize that running a small business definitely takes a village. Days often start early and end late and while we do our best to maintain regular office hours, we all know that doesn’t always happen. I’m thankful for the love and support of my husband and my three daughters, all of whom have tirelessly supported me and encouraged me on this journey, and who have also fallen victim to the occasional, “I just have one more call to make….” statement. Along those same lines, I’m thankful for morning cups of coffee that often get me through back to back meetings, and cocktails on my patio in the evening after a successful day. I’m thankful my business has allowed me to cut my commute time to zero, and that the construction on my block has finally ended. You don’t realize how loud construction is until you work in the virtual space and are forced to try and avoid the deluge of noise.  My gratefulness extends beyond my core team as well. I am thankful for virtual learning partners like my friends and colleagues at Turpin Communication in Chicago and my fellow Board members with the Southeastern Wisconsin Chapter of the Association for Talent Development (SEWI-ATD). Both regularly share advice, expertise, and provide perspective for me in my daily work. I am thankful for the ability to work virtually with individuals all over the world. I have learned so much, broadened my experiences and my knowledge, and have made friends I wouldn’t have had the opportunity to make otherwise. Lastly, I am thankful for you, the readers of our blog. Perhaps without knowing it, you also drive growth in our business, provide perspective, and increase our learning and communication skills with your questions and comments. The end of the year is a busy time for everyone. We’re all scrambling, trying to meet deadlines, and set up client meetings before the craziness of the holidays actually takes hold. But, as I sit here, peering out from under the stack of paperwork on my desk, I realize I am truly blessed. What are you thankful for? 

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Turpin Communication | Virtual Learning

Managing Two Simultaneous Audience Groups: In-Person and Remote Attendees

March 14, 2014 12:38 by Greg Owen-Boger
My team and I recently found ourselves in a situation we advise our clients to avoid. It occurs to me that if even WE can’t follow our own advice, how can we expect others to? So, instead of saying “don’t do it,” here’s some advice for dealing with it. The situation is this: You’re presenting to a group of individuals. You’re in the conference room and you have some slides to back you up. You also have a few people logging in remotely using a desktop sharing platform. It’s one thing to manage the group in the conference room. It’s an entirely different thing to manage the remote group as well. It’s nearly impossible to keep everyone focused and on the same page, which is why we don’t recommend doing it. But reality is what reality is. So, here are some ideas for managing both groups so that everyone remains equally engaged and actively participating. The main thing is to remain engaged so that you can monitor everything that’s going on. You have responsibility for both audience groups. Remind the in-person group to be thoughtfully inclusive of the people participating remotely. When side-bar conversations happen, they leave the remote participants feeling left out, as if they are merely observers rather than active participants. Ask remote attendees to put their phones on mute. Too much background noise coming from several phones at once becomes distracting to people in both groups. Encourage remote attendees to use the chat feature when they have questions or comments. Assign a spokesperson who can speak for the remote attendees. This person should monitor chat and be the voice and advocate of the remote attendees. Use directional language such as “in the upper right corner…,” or “moving on to slide 13….” These verbal cues will help everyone know where to focus. Check in with the remote attendees throughout by asking if they have anything they’d like to add to the conversation. At that point they can unmute themselves or use the chat feature. Managing both audience groups can be a real challenge, but by using these ideas, you should be able to do it without too much trouble.    

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Online Learning | Online Meetings | Turpin Communication

Dealing with Presentation Nervousness

July 15, 2013 10:02 by Dana Peters
Nervousness, even for experience presenters, is often part of the territory. It affects people in different ways for different reasons. One of our learning partners, Turpin Communication, specializes in presentation and facilitation skills training. Their VP, Greg Owen-Boger, and I have had several in-depth conversations about dealing with presentation nerves and have contributed the following thoughts in several LinkedIn discussions over the past few years. I thought you might find this information helpful as well. [More]

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Presentation Skills | The Orderly Conversation | Turpin Communication

In the Dark About Lighting? Tips from Our Video for eLearning Expert

June 19, 2013 16:10 by Dana Peters
In working with Greg Owen-Boger from Turpin Communication (one of our Learning Partners), I discovered this little nugget and I wanted to share with you. If you struggle with lighting when producing “talking head” video, this clip is a must see: [More]

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eLearning | Online Learning | Turpin Communication | Video Production

How Do We Want to Be Perceived?

June 14, 2013 10:35 by Dana Peters
I was on the road earlier this week with Greg Owen-Boger from Turpin Communication. Turpin is one of my Learning Partners and we were in Appleton, WI, for the Northeast Wisconsin Chapter of the American Society of Training & Development’s monthly program. The chapter goes by NEW ASTD for short. [More]

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Learning Trends | Train the Trainer | Turpin Communication

Presentation Baggage Causes Barriers to Learning

February 28, 2013 11:43 by Greg Owen-Boger
Recently I had a lively phone call with a potential client. It was clear that he had done his homework and had some pretty tough questions for me and the other presentation skills training vendors he was looking at. [More]

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Presentation Skills | Turpin Communication

My First "On-Camera" Experience

February 6, 2013 09:51 by Dana Peters
I am always looking for effective ways to communicate who we are and what we do to potential and existing clients. Last year, after the launch of our most recent addition of our website, it became clear to me that incorporating video into our site would allow me to give our message another dimension that is just not possible in words and images alone. [More]

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eLearning | Turpin Communication | Video Production

Engaging Learners in the “Orderly Conversation”

February 6, 2013 08:47 by Dana Peters
For those of you attending Greg Owen-Boger’s session at the Middle Tennessee Chapter of ASTD’s Day of Learning on February 21, here is the complete session overview. We hope to see you there! [More]

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Events | Train the Trainer | Turpin Communication