Four Mistakes to Avoid With the Visuals in Your Next Virtual Learning Session

April 24, 2018 12:54 by Dana Peters
The design and application of visual elements is critical to the success of any virtual instructor-led training session. Consider the quality of your visuals (like the PowerPoint slides) as it relates to the needs of your learners. From beginning to end, your slide design should support and enhance your learning objectives and your instructional message. Visual design components like aesthetics, colors, and fonts can enhance and even encourage engagement and retention. Poor design, however, can affect learners’ overall experience and the intended outcome for the session. There are several key things you should avoid when creating the visual elements of your virtual learning session. Clutter Less is more. Don’t fill up your slides with a word for word script or with images that aren’t relevant to your presentation. Negative space can be used to draw attention to specific areas or emphasize certain points. Remember, what’s not on the slide is sometimes just as important as what is. Color Craze Color is great. It can be used to enhance or even illicit specific emotions and convey messages to your audience. It can also be a distraction if not used appropriately. Maintaining a color scheme is important, we suggest sticking to a pallet of colors and using a few complimentary colors for emphasis. Colored text, as well as the type of font you are using can also play a role in retention and understanding. Make sure the color and the font you are using for your text is easy-to-read. Noise Noise is anything not relevant to your topic on hand. Try not to cover more than one idea on the screen at a time. Slide animation can be used for emphasis, but do so purposefully. It should not be a distraction. Keep it subtle and simple. It’s important to maintain a focus, and make sure your visual elements offer consistent opportunity for conversation, discussion, and learning. Organizational Chaos Finally, organization is critical. When tackling the visual elements of your virtual session it’s important to maintain order and consistency. Learners should be able to cohesively move through the session from one concept or idea to the next; without getting lost. Avoiding clutter and reducing noise within your visuals will help, but the use of concise slide titles and transitional agenda slides can help guide the learner through the progression of the session and maintain order in the delivery of the content. Of course, design can’t be mastered entirely with one post, but these items pertaining to your visual elements in your virtual training session are a good place to start.

Spring is Here…Time to Tidy Up Your vILT

March 20, 2018 09:56 by Dana Peters
Can it be? The calendar tells me the first day of spring is right around the corner. Here in Wisconsin, the weather is very slowly turning, and soon we will emerge from our winter hibernation.  With spring comes the inevitable cleaning sweep, and it reminds me of the post we did last year about ‘spring cleaning’ your Virtual Instructor-Led Training (vILT) materials. This one is worth a revisit. As we mentioned in last year’s post, it’s easy to “coast” once a program is successfully up and running. However, in the spirit of continuous improvement, it’s important to regularly revisit your virtual courses to determine the following is still happening: The learning objectives are being met The examples and case studies are relevant and effective All slide content is accurate The exercises are on target The documentation for delivering the session is accurate (like the facilitator guide) The “on the job” impact is being realized Ideally, you’d implement a content review schedule of your vILT, noting any examples, timestamps, or other references that may require a quick revision and update. Annually or even bi-annually, we recommend revisiting the established learning objectives to confirm whether or not they are still on target with the needs of the business and the learners. While some updates may require only a few slide additions and changes, some may require a complete session overhaul.  Either way, your learners, and ultimately your organization, will benefit from having fresh, relevant, and applicable training programs. Here’s wishing a warm and productive spring to you and your team.

The Modern Learner: Are You Meeting Their Needs?

January 30, 2018 18:10 by Dana Peters
Thanks to several factors, five generations make up today’s workforce; each with their own unique aspirations, motivations, and life experiences. It’s quite possible today’s workforce is the most diverse any business leader has experienced. From a training standpoint, the changing workforce and the emergence of new technology has changed the definition of what today’s learner looks like regardless of generation. The modern learner knows no age. It’s imperative that companies and learning development professionals continually grow and adapt their learning culture to meet the expectations of today’s learner. Reaching today’s learner begins with understanding who they are and what they want.   We’ve developed a short list to define today’s modern learner. Knowing and understanding who today’s modern learner is, can help you decide if your company is doing everything it can to reach them effectively.    Today’s modern learner is…   Requires Convenience   Today’s learner is on the go. They want to be able to ‘learn’ everywhere they are. This can mean accessing learning opportunities from their desk computer and phone, but it can also mean accessing it from home, accessing it from a tablet, or from their mobile device, whenever and wherever they want to.   Seeks Instant Gratification Time is valuable for today’s learner. They are often overwhelmed and overworked and almost always distracted by some internal or external force. Statistic Brain Research Institute reports that the average attention span of today’s adult is just 8 seconds. That means in 8 seconds or less, your learner will decide if your session is worth his or her time. Clearly stating the objectives up front, the course agenda, and intended benefits of the session will hold the learners attention for the duration of the session. Mixed media including video, activities, and small group work will also help retain learners’ attention. In addition, today’s learner wants answers now. On demand learning is crucial for today’s learner. That’s why technology like Google, Alexa, and Suri are so popular. It’s important to make sure your company can provide opportunities and resources for in the moment and on demand learning.    Demands Value & Relevance   This too plays into gratification. Today’s modern learner wants it all. Not only do they demand instant gratification and convenience. They want big returns on their investment of time and energy. Time is valuable and today’s learner does not want to spend time away from day-to-day work for something that has little or no relevance to their current responsibilities or doesn’t enhance their potential for that next promotion or career move.   In Control   The modern learner wants to be in control of his or her learning and development. They want options and choices and they want to be in control of their career and development path. Learning choices should vary in content, in length, in availability, and in medium. The modern learner does not need mandatory learning and development requirements to learn. They choose learning, but it must be flexible, convenient, and on their own terms.   Collaborative   Social elements drive today’s society, both on the personal and professional front. Today’s learners rely on Google for answers and they look to peers and colleagues to provide them with the ability to support their learning on the job. In fact, Bersin reports that nearly 80 percent of workforce learning happens via on the job interactions with peers, teammates, and managers. As stated above, the modern learner wants to learn. They want to grow and adapt to be more successful on their job and they want to share their ideas and collaborate with other like-minded professionals.   I want to be clear, the modern learner can be found in all generations. Too often, these discussions take place with a focus on serving a younger, more technology focused generation.  A Baby Boomer, for example, can appreciate the convenience and technology virtual learning provides just as much (or even more) than a millennial.   Now that you know more about what the modern learner looks like, is your company doing everything it can to reach them?   Let us know in the comments below!  

Say What You Mean: Defining Learning Lingo for Your Organization.

June 6, 2017 10:00 by Dana Peters
We’ve all heard (and regularly use) terms like e-learning, webinar, web-based training, virtual training, digital learning, and distance learning.  However, ask ten people what e-learning means and you’re likely to get ten different answers.I’ve had the pleasure of working with all sorts of clients, large and small, with varying degrees of sophistication within their learning and development departments. Working with different clients means learning their learning culture’s unique language. Even the simplest of terms may mean something different to the client than it does to me and the Mondo Learning Solutions team members on the project. To make things more confusing, terms are often used interchangeably, even though technically, they do have different meanings. If you are in a situation where an outside professional is assisting you with the development and delivery of learning programs, establishing definitions is important. If that weren’t enough, let’s consider the other internal folks outside of our profession. While the learning terms used may be clear to everyone on your learning and development team, it may not be clear to your learners or stakeholders. Taking from my personal experience, I think of this issue a little bit like the different terms or words for items used all over the country. The same terms to name certain items in Wisconsin, where I’m based, might be called something completely different in a different part of the country.  A few examples: bubbler and drinking fountain, shopping cart and buggy, or even pop and soda. Not having moved here until I was 24, imagine my surprise when someone asked me where the bubbler was.When defining terms related to learning delivery methods, you want to make sure everyone is on the same page. Let’s take a quick look at the Association for Talent Development’s (ATD) official definitions for the following terms: Web-based Training (WBT): Delivery of educational content via a Web browser over the public Internet, a private intranet, or an extranet. Web-based training often provides links to other learning resources such as references, email, bulletin boards, and discussion groups. WBT also may include a facilitator who can provide course guidelines, manage discussion boards, deliver lectures, and so forth. When used with a facilitator, WBT offers some advantages of instructor-led training while also retaining the advantages of computer-based training. E-learning: A wide set of applications and processes, such as web-based learning, computer-based learning, virtual classrooms, and digital collaboration. It includes the delivery of content via Internet, intranet/extranet (LAN/WAN), audio- and videotape, satellite broadcast, interactive TV, CD-ROM, and more. Webinar: A small synchronous online learning event in which a presenter and audience members communicate via text chat or audio about concepts often illustrated via online slides and/or an electronic whiteboard. Webinars are often archived as well for asynchronous, on-demand access. ILT (instructor-led training): Usually refers to traditional classroom training, in which an instructor teaches a course to a room of learners. The term is used synonymously with on-site training and classroom training (c-learning). Asynchronous Learning: Learning in which interaction between instructors and students occurs intermittently with a time delay. Examples are self-paced courses taken via the Internet or CD-ROM, Q&A mentoring, online discussion groups, and email. Synchronous Learning: A real-time, instructor-led online learning event in which all participants are logged on at the same time and communicate directly with each other. In this virtual classroom setting, the instructor maintains control of the class, with the ability to "call on" participants. In most platforms, students and teachers can use a whiteboard to see work in progress and share knowledge. Interaction may also occur via audio or video conferencing, Internet telephony, or two-way live broadcasts. While these may be the official definitions for the profession, organizations across the country have their own “dialect”.  This is where it can be challenging.As you can see, virtual instructor-led training (vILT) is not defined independently by ATD, but that is the term, we here at Mondo Learning Solutions, use to define what others might call synchronous learning, a webinar, or even e-learning.I agree that official definitions are helpful, but what is more important is that everyone is on the same page. Existing company vocabulary and semantics might mean your company refers to a web-based training as a webinar, or a vILT class as e-learning, and that’s ok. As long as everyone is aware of those semantics and what is actually being defined. What about you? Has definition differences of common training terms caused any problems within your organization? We’d love to hear your stories.  

Spring Cleaning Isn’t Just for Your Closet; Virtual Programs Need Tidying Too.

March 21, 2017 10:00 by Dana Peters
Ahhh spring is in the air! The flowers are peeking out from under their blanket of dirt, and here in the Midwest we’ve already been able to enjoy some rather unseasonably warm weather. With warmer days and more daylight comes the annual spring cleaning sweep. While you’re in the process of digging out your summer wardrobe and purging the rest of your winter clutter, we think it’s a good time to examine your virtual instructor-led training (vILT) materials as well. After setting up a vILT program, it’s easy to get complacent, particularly when a program is running smoothly, and the feedback from your facilitators and learners is positive. When starting, you probably put in a lot of work. You hired a team of designers, put together strategic initiatives, and set out to meet the goals of your business. But it can’t stop there. In the spirit of continuous improvement, it’s important to regularly revisit your virtual courses to determine the following is still happening: The learning objectives are being met The examples and case studies are relevant and effective All slide content is accurate The exercises are on target The documentation for delivering the session is accurate (like the facilitator guide) The “on the job” impact is being realized If you’re not evaluating the ‘on the job’ application of your training, you should be. Tracking whether your learners are able to apply what they have learned back on the job, will not only ensure the longevity of your program, but the overall success of your business. In addition, we encourage you to comb through your material at least annually, if not bi-annually; take note of examples, time stamps, or other relevant material that may require a quick slide revision or update. But also, revisit the established learning objectives.  With your stakeholders, determine whether the objectives have remained the same or if they’ve grown or changed. Then determine whether or not your existing vILT program still meets those learning objectives. While some updates may require only a few slide additions and changes, some may require a complete session overhaul.  Either way, your learners, and ultimately your organization, will benefit from having fresh, relevant, and applicable training programs.  

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Learning | Training | Virtual Instructor-Led Training

Quiz Time! Does Your Company Culture Support vILT?

March 14, 2017 10:00 by Dana Peters
In case you missed our previous post, there is still time to take our quiz and see!Looking for something to revitalize your company’s training and education program? A new virtual training program or an expansion of your existing program might be the right move. But will your company culture support vILT? Before spending the time and resources to launch a robust vILT program, consider taking our assessment to help determine how ready your organization is, and what steps you need to take in order to develop a culture that fully supports vILT. Find out now! Does Your Company Culture Support vILT?

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Online Learning | Training | Virtual Instructor-Led Training

Considerations When Working with a Global Audience

February 15, 2017 10:00 by Dana Peters
Virtual instructor-led training (vILT) presents unique opportunities and challenges for companies with operations throughout the world. On one hand, a vILT program can bring together learners from all over the world, efficiently and cost effectively.  On the other hand, there are a few more considerations to keep in mind when facilitating and designing learning content for a global audience. From our experience working on global vILT projects, we wanted to share a few key points we think might be helpful for you to consider. Instructional Design What you show and share during your virtual session needs to be applicable to a global audience. This means any image, particularly images representing metaphors, must be broadly understood. Using an image of a bird with a worm in its mouth with a sunrise in the background to represent moving swiftly on a new market opportunity, may not create the mental connection you are looking for with anyone who doesn’t know or understand the expression, “The early bird gets the worm!” Pay close attention to examples, case studies, or stories you’re including within your learning to make sure they are globally applicable as well as inclusive of multiple cultures. Use pre-work as an opportunity for participants to prepare responses for questions the facilitator will pose in class or contributions the participants may need to make to exercises. This will build confidence for non-native speakers to be more comfortable speaking out and participating in class. Facilitation Techniques Facilitating to a global audience can be even more challenging. Many times you will be presenting to learners who don’t natively speak your language. Let’s use English as an example. Many learners around the world know and understand English, but many don’t consider themselves fluent. It’s important to speak clearly, enunciate your speech, and slowdown in pace. The number one piece of constructive feedback our clients receive from learners is that the facilitator speaks too fast. Consider what specific questions and directions you will pose in class verbally. We suggest having those questions written out on the slides, posed as poll questions, or posted in the chat. Often times, second language learners will be more comfortable reading the questions or writing their responses than speaking. This will encourage active participation from all learners. Consider also posting key learning objectives in the chat or in written form as well. Keep in mind; this may take up some extra class time. Work with your course designers so they understand whom your core audience is and the need to build in extra time for communication. While speaking, it may be tempting to refer to current events, pop culture, or to speak in slang or jargon. Be wary, these references may not connect with learners not native to your country. Additionally, we suggest practicing pronunciation of foreign names. While most learners will not be upset if a virtual facilitator mispronounces their name, they will notice your effort to try and get it right. This will help with connecting with the learner on a personal level and encourages engagement and active participation as well. Scheduling Scheduling is another item to consider when working with a global audience. Pay close attention to the differences in time and eliminate time-sensitive phrases like “Good Morning” from your delivery. During breaks or when timing portions of your learning program don’t use the exact time it is for you. Instead practice using phrases like “ten past the hour” or “half past the hour” to make your time reference applicable to all learners, regardless of time zone. It’s important also to consider global holidays and traditional work hours across the world when scheduling your virtual learning session. For example, most companies would avoid scheduling a virtual learning session on Thanksgiving Day here in the United States, but Thanksgiving isn’t celebrated globally. Independence Day is different for every country, and religious holidays take priority over work in some countries too. While it will be impossible to accommodate every country around the globe, be aware of where your learners are located. Take care to consider major public holidays and work hours. There are many considerations to working with a global audience. What other strategies do you have?

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Events | Learning | Training | Virtual Learning

Happy Birthday Mondo Learning Solutions!

January 25, 2017 10:00 by Dana Peters
Mondo Learning Solutions is celebrating six years in business today! Our small business became officially registered with the state of Wisconsin on January 25, 2011, and we couldn’t be more proud of the work we’ve accomplished since then. In six years, we’ve worked with some amazing clients, many who have been with us since the very beginning, and still more who hire us for ongoing services as our company continues to grow. Repeat and referral business has been instrumental in the success of our company, and speaks volumes to the quality services we set out to provide from day one. As you may well know, our purpose is to help our clients plan, design, and deliver groundbreaking online learning training and events. Over time, we’ve grown our company to one that provides services, consulting, and professional development opportunities, solely focused on the virtual learning space. As I reflect on our history I am amazed at what has been accomplished: We have developed a consulting approach that focuses on four components to success in the virtual learning, presentation, and meeting space. In 2016, we supported more than 500 virtual learning sessions. Since inception we have been involved in the design and implementation of nearly 50 virtual learning courses around the world. We’ve grown our expertise in several platforms including Adobe Connect, WebEx, GoToTraining, Blackboard Collaborate, and Zoom. In addition to English, we have the ability to deliver services and facilitate sessions in Chinese, Portuguese, Spanish, and German. I left the corporate world, and made the decision to start this business in August 2010. Today, the Mondo Learning Solutions family now consists of over 15 learning experts and consultants. Ten are based here in the United States, one in Germany, one in Brazil, and one in China. We are a small but mighty family, and we plan to continue to grow and expand to meet the needs of our global clients as necessary. Celebrating six years in business has given us time to reflect on the things we’ve accomplished as a company.  The path may not be exactly as we envisioned, but it has truly been a fantastic ride. Cheers to six years in business! Thank you to all our clients and readers. Here’s to many more successful years.

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Learning | Presentation | Training

Supporting Sessions Around the World: Mondo offers Producer Services in Portuguese

December 6, 2016 10:00 by Dana Peters
Mondo Learning Solutions has once again expanded our global services by adding Natalia Melo to our learning expert team. Natalia will provide Producer Services in Portuguese for our global clients. While many of our global clients require their employees to communicate in English, Mondo Learning has discovered the act of learning new skills while also translating a language can hinder a participant’s ability to learn. By offering Producer Services in native languages, like Portuguese, this allows us to further meet the virtual classroom support needs of our global clients. As a side note, we also globally support sessions in Spanish, German, and Chinese. As always, eliminating the language obstacle can improve comprehension, and allow participants to feel more comfortable and confident participating in group discussions and exercises. In their native language, participants can fully understand examples, scenarios, case studies, and the exercises utilized in a virtual session. Additionally, when sessions are delivered in a native tongue, learners are more likely to walk away meeting the intended learning objectives of the course and the desired application of new skills back on the job. Natalia Melo is an experienced professional. She has worked as an educator in both English and Portuguese, and has also worked as a business development analyst and a translator. She earned her degree in publishing, advertising, and marketing and takes a collaborative approach to each project. Natalia is well versed in Microsoft Office, Adobe Illustrator, and Photoshop. She currently resides in Brazil, but has also worked as an English teacher throughout South Africa and New Zealand. Our clients do business all over the world. Our ability to serve them sufficiently remains our number one priority. As our clients continue to grow, Mondo Learning Solutions is committed to growing with them which means adding additional language services to better meet the training and development needs of our clients.

Visual Appeal: The Importance of Visual Elements in the Virtual Classroom.

August 9, 2016 10:00 by Dana Peters
We’ve all, undoubtedly, heard the expression, “A picture is worth a thousand words.” In my business, I’ve learned that that may actually be an understatement. The design and application of visual elements is critical to a successful virtual presentation or training session. I would argue that the virtual classroom is a visual medium, more so even than a face-to-face classroom environment. Rather than looking at a physical presenter, participants in the virtual space are staring at a screen. It is important that what learners are visually taking in, strongly supports and enhances the instructional message.Studies across industries have found that images, info-graphics, and videos are at least 500 percent more likely to be seen than words that deliver the exact same message, and it goes beyond just the use of images. Visual Design components like aesthetics, colors, and fonts can enhance and encourage engagement and retention.  As a side note, Tim Slade, an e-learning professional, author and speaker for Artisan E-Learning and E-Learning Uncovered, has a lot to say about this. I featured his perspective in a previous post.Visual components in the virtual classroom to consider include the PowerPoint presentation, any electronic documents that are shared or displayed, video clips, image files, webcams, and the physical classroom layout (if customizable). We will cover the visual use of webcams in a future post, but today I’d like to focus mainly on the PowerPoint presentation, the primary visual tool for your classroom. The visual aesthetic of your pre-work materials, as well as any shared or displayed documents is important too, but serve mostly as secondary visual tools. The ideas I present ahead will apply to these secondary visuals as well. First and foremost, I have a few key guidelines for you to consider when designing your virtual classroom slides: Less is More The words on your slides should be just enough to reinforce or support your discussion. It should not be a script of what you are planning to say. Use whitespace. What’s NOT on the slide is just as important as what is. Whitespace helps draw attention and allows your participants to focus in on what is important. Make it Interesting and Relevant In the virtual classroom, slides are a key visual element, they should capture interest quickly. Make sure images are on target and easy for participants to connect with. Are they relevant and suitable for the message you are trying to communicate? Design slides that spark conversation and get participants thinking. Be Clear and Consistent Maintain focus, don’t cover several topics on one slide. Don’t force the participant to read text packed slides, they can’t read & listen to what you, and others, are saying at the same time. Let’s take a look at an example. This “before slide” demonstrates what NOT to do. So where are the opportunities for improvement? There are way too many words on this slide. We’ve determined already that participants cannot read and listen at the same time. The image on the slide is too large, there’s no whitespace, it’s difficult to read, and there’s not a clear focal point. Next, same slide, but designed using our key guidelines. You’ll notice: The image is smaller, which makes it more relevant and less distracting. There’s more whitespace on the slide. We’ve also chosen to illustrate the “process” through movement in boxes rather than bullets. This allows the viewer ample space to comprehend. Additionally, the text that appears on the slide is both important and useful, it doesn’t repeat, but offers a highlight of the important concepts. Visually, the second slide is more appealing. It captures the attention of the viewer, and encourages questions, discussion, and participation. Remember, in the virtual classroom, your participants will mostly be looking at the screen, at your presentation. Virtual sessions often bring together participants from all over the world. While languages across the globe come with their own anecdotes, expressions, and idioms, when selected appropriately, images can be universal. What can be said in 300 words on a slide can be said with a single image and potentially be understood in virtually every language. What can you share about your experiences with virtual presentations? I’d love to hear your thoughts.