5 Key Components of a Successful Remote Workforce

April 10, 2018 11:29 by Dana Peters
At the top of most employee’s working conditions “wish list” is some level of flexibility. Effective and productive remote work opportunities can provide that benefit. Remote work capabilities also offer advantages for employers. Employers can reduce some overhead costs, rely on a happier (often more productive) workforce, and choose from a larger talent pool when hiring for open positions. So how does an employer adjust to the growing population of employees working remotely and do so effectively? At Mondo Learning Solutions several of our clients successfully manage a remote, often global, workforce. Our team at Mondo is also primarily remote. Based on our experiences and what we have observed, the following is a list of key components common amongst organizations that have successfully built and manage a remote workforce. Expectations As an employer, defining your expectations surrounding remote work and how it will be conducted is a critical step in the process. Once those expectations and parameters have been defined, communication needs to take place, both written and verbal. Conversations about schedules, working hours, time off, and communication protocol need to take place and be agreed to. Furthermore, employees working remotely need to understand the role they play in the overall success of the organization, regardless of their physical location.  Communication Overall, communication must be top of mind for all parties involved in the remote work relationship. Hallway and informal lunch time conversations will not occur with a remote workforce so having a communication protocol in place is necessary for success. Establish good communication from the beginning of the working relationship by implementing a comprehensive employee onboarding process. The onboarding process should not only outline expectations, but also introduce remote employees to members of the team, individuals they will be working with and projects they will be working on. It’s important for employees to see the impact of the work they do, and communicating effectively is key to managing that. Technology Technology is your best friend when managing a workforce all over the globe. More than ever, technology has the ability to put people “face-to-face” even from remote locations. But it goes beyond just investing in the right technology. Employers need to make sure their remote workforce can utilize technology; that they have the proper equipment and remote office set up. Technology also goes beyond equipment. File sharing services and all collaboration programs remote employees will leverage to work together need to be in place and part of daily work life. Training Training, in my opinion, is folded in to all that we have discussed so far. When thinking about new training initiatives, consider your remote employees equally when making decisions about learning programs and access to those programs. It’s important to include your remote employees, and to explore options other than travel when doing so. Virtual training options can reduce expenses and reach a global audience more efficiently in most cases. Collaboration Remote employees and managers within a company still need to feel a sense of team connection and have the ability to collaborate even though they do not share the same physical space. Employers should provide and promote the use of online or virtual collaboration tools. Through these tools, teams can collaborate on various projects, discuss project roadblocks with colleagues, and see end results of their completed work. Additionally, with remote workers, it’s important to combat isolation. Providing opportunities to collaborate will help build a sense of community and position teams to be successful. Simple check-in calls between team members or their managers will also help to build a collaborative team environment, and alleviate any isolation issues remote employees may be dealing with. A remote workforce is an opportunity both for the employer and the employee. What tips do you have for managing a remote workforce? Anything we haven’t mentioned here? Leave us a note in the comments. 

The Modern Learner: Are You Meeting Their Needs?

January 30, 2018 18:10 by Dana Peters
Thanks to several factors, five generations make up today’s workforce; each with their own unique aspirations, motivations, and life experiences. It’s quite possible today’s workforce is the most diverse any business leader has experienced. From a training standpoint, the changing workforce and the emergence of new technology has changed the definition of what today’s learner looks like regardless of generation. The modern learner knows no age. It’s imperative that companies and learning development professionals continually grow and adapt their learning culture to meet the expectations of today’s learner. Reaching today’s learner begins with understanding who they are and what they want.   We’ve developed a short list to define today’s modern learner. Knowing and understanding who today’s modern learner is, can help you decide if your company is doing everything it can to reach them effectively.    Today’s modern learner is…   Requires Convenience   Today’s learner is on the go. They want to be able to ‘learn’ everywhere they are. This can mean accessing learning opportunities from their desk computer and phone, but it can also mean accessing it from home, accessing it from a tablet, or from their mobile device, whenever and wherever they want to.   Seeks Instant Gratification Time is valuable for today’s learner. They are often overwhelmed and overworked and almost always distracted by some internal or external force. Statistic Brain Research Institute reports that the average attention span of today’s adult is just 8 seconds. That means in 8 seconds or less, your learner will decide if your session is worth his or her time. Clearly stating the objectives up front, the course agenda, and intended benefits of the session will hold the learners attention for the duration of the session. Mixed media including video, activities, and small group work will also help retain learners’ attention. In addition, today’s learner wants answers now. On demand learning is crucial for today’s learner. That’s why technology like Google, Alexa, and Suri are so popular. It’s important to make sure your company can provide opportunities and resources for in the moment and on demand learning.    Demands Value & Relevance   This too plays into gratification. Today’s modern learner wants it all. Not only do they demand instant gratification and convenience. They want big returns on their investment of time and energy. Time is valuable and today’s learner does not want to spend time away from day-to-day work for something that has little or no relevance to their current responsibilities or doesn’t enhance their potential for that next promotion or career move.   In Control   The modern learner wants to be in control of his or her learning and development. They want options and choices and they want to be in control of their career and development path. Learning choices should vary in content, in length, in availability, and in medium. The modern learner does not need mandatory learning and development requirements to learn. They choose learning, but it must be flexible, convenient, and on their own terms.   Collaborative   Social elements drive today’s society, both on the personal and professional front. Today’s learners rely on Google for answers and they look to peers and colleagues to provide them with the ability to support their learning on the job. In fact, Bersin reports that nearly 80 percent of workforce learning happens via on the job interactions with peers, teammates, and managers. As stated above, the modern learner wants to learn. They want to grow and adapt to be more successful on their job and they want to share their ideas and collaborate with other like-minded professionals.   I want to be clear, the modern learner can be found in all generations. Too often, these discussions take place with a focus on serving a younger, more technology focused generation.  A Baby Boomer, for example, can appreciate the convenience and technology virtual learning provides just as much (or even more) than a millennial.   Now that you know more about what the modern learner looks like, is your company doing everything it can to reach them?   Let us know in the comments below!  

Learning Trends to Watch in 2018

January 9, 2018 15:25 by Dana Peters
  With the New Year upon us, we look ahead towards the opportunities in our field to meet the needs of our clients. Based on our conversations with our clients, the following are the hot topics on their project radars for 2018.   Mobile Learning Mobile devices are everywhere. This is not a new trend. Learning professionals continue to adapt in order to accommodate learners’ mobile lifestyles. Companies have already started moving their content to mobile platforms and applications. Employees rely on mobile devices to access information and training content while on the job. This trend goes beyond the formal training session to meeting the learners where they are, when they need the information. Mobile learning also supports another trend we see gaining in popularity: Microlearning. Microlearning Time is valuable. So is training. Companies are starting to realize that not every training opportunity needs (or can) be a two day training session. Our clients have started to take advantage of microlearning opportunities, short bursts of learning that employees can consume in a short period of time. The trend suggests that as more people continue to do more with less, microlearning techniques are better received and retained by employees. We expect this trend to continue. Content Curation Part of content curation again speaks to the individuals desire to have knowledge at their finger tips. The increase in accessibility of the internet, particularly on mobile devices, puts answers in front of people almost immediately. In a learning atmosphere, we can use that thirst for knowledge by curating relevant and accurate information in one place for employees. We see this happening with unique internal content such as company manuals, policies, procedures etc., but also by leveraging relevant and useful existing content from external sources. This might be content on federal regulations, from law libraries, or targeted general topics such as proper email etiquette, or health and wellness information. Big Data As today’s business world continues to move in a digital direction, data in the business world becomes easier to collect and use. Industries across the board are realizing the value of collecting that information and the learning industry is no different. Again, not a new trend, but we see our clients continuing to capture analytics on learning tool utilization, content access, and knowledge application on the job.  Using the data helps learning and development professionals quantify activity and show value they can directly link to business results. Distributed Workforce This is also a trend we have continued to see grow over the past several years. As more employees desire flexible work schedules and technology continues to improve working from home, larger groups of employees are able to do their jobs remotely. A remote workforce can present new challenges. Managers leading remote teams need different skills to support their teams successfully. Our clients and other learning professionals continue to enhance learning curriculum in support of the skills necessary for both individual contributors and managers to be successful in a remote work environment. Gamification of Learning This is a trend we will explore in more detail later this year, but we do see this trend continuing to gain traction in 2018. New studies indicate that some forms of game based learning have higher retention rates than more traditional methods. We see some clients exploring gamification methods to take the mundane out of mandatory training requirements and encourage employees to engage in the learning process. Some organizations are exploring new ways to ‘gamify’ their existing learning programs for their in house training, compliance courses, information security, and other procedural trainings. As we kick off 2018, we will be on the lookout for these and other trends in the industry, and will continue to share our resources and experiences. Wishing you great success in the year ahead.

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Learning Trends

Building Bulletproof Online Training Programs

June 5, 2014 08:03 by Dana Peters
When talking with clients new to virtual instructor-led training (VILT), I am often asked: “What do we need to get absolutely right to be successful training our employees online in the live virtual classroom?” From our perspective, when the following four components are “done right” an organization is in the optimal position to deliver high-quality virtual learning programs that meet the intended learning objectives. Here they are: Well-aligned virtual platform tools and technology With over 100 virtual classroom platforms, and growing, available on the market today, learning and development departments are not short on options. Selecting the most appropriate tools and technology to meet your organization’s unique programing needs and to achieve your learning program objectives is an important component to positioning your program for ongoing success. A well-aligned learning platform and any related technology tools will be more than capable of meeting the needs of your designers, your delivery team, and your learners. A meticulously prepared facilitation team Everyone involved in the delivery of virtual classes needs to have the appropriate skills necessary to meet and exceed their duties in this environment. Whether it be as the facilitator or trainer, the producer or host, or as the technical support person. Well-defined roles, a solid training program, opportunities for skill practice with feedback and coaching, and an extensive preparation process is required for each person involved to perform at the level necessary for a best-in-class virtual training program. Solid content design, especially created for the live online environment In order to deliver an engaging virtual instructor-led training (VILT) learning experience, the instructional design of each course needs to be specifically created for the VILT environment. Materials from other delivery modalities are good resources, but they will not stand alone successfully in the virtual classroom. They need to be transitioned to take advantage of the delivery tools and functionality your learning platform offers. Structurally, courses will be segmented differently, activities and exercises will be approached differently, and the application of pre- course work, in-between session work, and post-session follow-up components will be applied. A culture and climate that encourages, supports, and prepares online participants Often organizations spend all of their time and energy selecting the right technology, grooming their delivery team, and creating instructionally sound classes, yet their virtual learning program is not meeting their expectations. The energy and demand they anticipated for the program is flat. Why? Often what is overlooked is the time and effort necessary to create a culture and climate that encourages, supports, and prepares online learners. This means marketing the program internally, taking steps to garner executive-level support, and implementing steps to adequately prepare learners to learn in the virtual environment. I would love to hear your thoughts on these components. Is this dead on from your experience or is there something you would add?