Need Better Results From Your Subject Matter Experts?

December 12, 2017 10:23 by Dana Peters
At Mondo Learning Solutions we’re committed to helping our clients grow, which is why we try to pass along the best and latest resources to help in your business. Our friends and colleagues at Chicago-based Turpin Communication recently released a new book, “Effective SMEs: A Trainer’s Guide for Helping Subject Matter Experts Facilitate Learning”. This book is one you will want to have in your library. We regularly work with subject matter experts (SMEs) in the virtual classroom, which has both its advantages and disadvantages. As Turpin suggests, SMEs do bring credibility and relevance to the classroom, but that is often not enough to deliver an effective session. For many SMEs the training environment is unfamiliar terrain. They are often authorities on a particular topic, not on adult learning and aren’t necessarily familiar with effective facilitation techniques.  I like this book specifically because it comes from a place of experience. Authors Dale Ludwig and Greg Owen-Boger leverage decades of work helping presenters, instructional designers, and subject matter experts become better communicators. They use detailed and relatable workplace scenarios plucked directly from their own experiences to assist readers in learning about a variety of learning situations. The book serves as a blueprint for managing SME-led training with the underlying premise that successful training stems from a place of communication and an understanding of everyone’s role.It also digs into best practices for coaching your SMEs. It’s available for purchase on Amazon.com and most bookstores, and the first chapter is available for free on the Association for Talent Development website. Give it a look.

Ditch the Bubbly: Water is What Matters.

May 19, 2015 09:23 by Dana Peters
Instructional designers and subject matter experts (SMEs) of virtual instructor-led training, this post is especially for you.I know I am preaching to the choir when I say, “time is precious.” This sentiment is magnified in the virtual training space. After all, your intention is to offer your participants learning opportunities that support their success back on the job and, of course, you need to do it with less time. If you struggle at what I refer to as the “pare-down process” when converting face-to-face classes to virtual classes, set the stage at your next design review meeting with this analogy. Champagne vs Water Think of all the information you have on your topic as either champagne or water. Champagne information is nice to have, an offshoot on the topic, or more of an FYI. Champagne information is not critical it’s a luxury. Learning objectives will be met without it. Conversely, water information is essential to topic at hand; absolutely necessary to the learner being successful at reaching the learning goals, and for results to be achieved back on the job. Without water it is not likely learning objectives will be met. I invite you to take a closer look. Often times, virtual learning sessions are repurposed from longer, more in-depth, face-to-face learning sessions. But how do you take a half-day in-person class and turn it into a 90 minute virtual learning session without losing its effectiveness? Now, SMEs, I know it’s not unusual for you to think every piece of content in your class is valuable. You are the experts and you’re passionate about your subjects. I respect that...a lot. Designers, this is where your SMEs need your guidance to stay on track.   With your well-crafted learning objectives front and center, comb through the material page-by-page or slide-by-slide; decide what absolutely needs to be included in order for your participants to meet the objectives.Do a reality check. Ask previous participants of the past face-to-face course to help you drill down to what they actually applied back on the job. Asking previous learners about the true value will help you identify your water content. So what about all that champagne? Don’t throw it down the drain just yet.Champagne content could be included elsewhere in a format that is more elective and self-directed. Think podcast, discussion boards, and internal blog posts. I realize some of your learners are hungry and want to absorb everything they can on a topic. Certainly serve that population, but separately and on demand.  How do you decide what content is water and what content is champagne?  What is your approach for making those kinds of decisions?