5 Key Components of a Successful Remote Workforce

April 10, 2018 11:29 by Dana Peters
At the top of most employee’s working conditions “wish list” is some level of flexibility. Effective and productive remote work opportunities can provide that benefit. Remote work capabilities also offer advantages for employers. Employers can reduce some overhead costs, rely on a happier (often more productive) workforce, and choose from a larger talent pool when hiring for open positions. So how does an employer adjust to the growing population of employees working remotely and do so effectively? At Mondo Learning Solutions several of our clients successfully manage a remote, often global, workforce. Our team at Mondo is also primarily remote. Based on our experiences and what we have observed, the following is a list of key components common amongst organizations that have successfully built and manage a remote workforce. Expectations As an employer, defining your expectations surrounding remote work and how it will be conducted is a critical step in the process. Once those expectations and parameters have been defined, communication needs to take place, both written and verbal. Conversations about schedules, working hours, time off, and communication protocol need to take place and be agreed to. Furthermore, employees working remotely need to understand the role they play in the overall success of the organization, regardless of their physical location.  Communication Overall, communication must be top of mind for all parties involved in the remote work relationship. Hallway and informal lunch time conversations will not occur with a remote workforce so having a communication protocol in place is necessary for success. Establish good communication from the beginning of the working relationship by implementing a comprehensive employee onboarding process. The onboarding process should not only outline expectations, but also introduce remote employees to members of the team, individuals they will be working with and projects they will be working on. It’s important for employees to see the impact of the work they do, and communicating effectively is key to managing that. Technology Technology is your best friend when managing a workforce all over the globe. More than ever, technology has the ability to put people “face-to-face” even from remote locations. But it goes beyond just investing in the right technology. Employers need to make sure their remote workforce can utilize technology; that they have the proper equipment and remote office set up. Technology also goes beyond equipment. File sharing services and all collaboration programs remote employees will leverage to work together need to be in place and part of daily work life. Training Training, in my opinion, is folded in to all that we have discussed so far. When thinking about new training initiatives, consider your remote employees equally when making decisions about learning programs and access to those programs. It’s important to include your remote employees, and to explore options other than travel when doing so. Virtual training options can reduce expenses and reach a global audience more efficiently in most cases. Collaboration Remote employees and managers within a company still need to feel a sense of team connection and have the ability to collaborate even though they do not share the same physical space. Employers should provide and promote the use of online or virtual collaboration tools. Through these tools, teams can collaborate on various projects, discuss project roadblocks with colleagues, and see end results of their completed work. Additionally, with remote workers, it’s important to combat isolation. Providing opportunities to collaborate will help build a sense of community and position teams to be successful. Simple check-in calls between team members or their managers will also help to build a collaborative team environment, and alleviate any isolation issues remote employees may be dealing with. A remote workforce is an opportunity both for the employer and the employee. What tips do you have for managing a remote workforce? Anything we haven’t mentioned here? Leave us a note in the comments. 

Getting vILT Right on a Global Scale

February 27, 2018 12:30 by Dana Peters
Effectively managing and maintaining a global virtual instructor-led training (vILT) program comes with unique challenges.  In our experience the best run programs are managed with a strong emphasis on attention to detail, clear and consistent communication, and a high level of commitment to process improvement. A vILT global program typically involves a large pool of facilitators, a globally diverse set of participants, and a dependency on technology. While managing a global program certainly is not easy; technology has made the communication and management of logistical details required for successful execution much easier. Below are our top five tips to consider when managing global vILT programs. “Gather” your facilitators For a global vILT program, you will likely have a global team of facilitators. We recommend utilizing technology to not only train your facilitators, but to also store your content. File sharing sites allow facilitator guides, timing outlines, and presentation decks to be housed in one location. Facilitators around the globe can access those files for their own preparation and in real time. From a version management perspective this will also ensure your team of facilitators are working from the most current version of the course content. Champion the Program Just like any vILT program, a global program will require commitment and ‘buy in’ from leaders in all parts of the globe. Establishing clear guidelines and effectively communicating the goals for the program will help you earn leadership support. This support is necessary to drive participation in the program and foster application of newly learned skills back on the job. For more information on getting the leadership team to champion your program, check out our previous post: Making the Pitch: Selling Your Executives on Virtual Learning. Establish Consistency Consistency is crucial for a successful global program. It’s important to establish a program management strategy and to stick to it. We suggest dedicating specific resources to be responsible for the communication surrounding the program. The marketing of the program, invitations, pre-work, and learning materials need to be delivered and communicated consistently. We also recommend specific resources be responsible for all aspects of scheduling, both on the learner side and the facilitation delivery side. In addition to maintaining these processes, it is also important to adapt those processes as things change or gaps are discovered. Know your Time Zones Running a global program means managing sessions in multiple time zones. Additionally, you may have a session running in East Asia by a facilitator in the United States. Technology can be helpful when converting class times to different time zones, but we recommend posting the session in a standard time zone in which the participants are used to working with and always stating times with time zone included. This will make it easier for your facilitation team to determine the class time for their location and will help alleviate conversion mistakes. It’s also important to know the national holidays in countries where your company does business. If facilities are closed, chances are your participants will not be participating. It’s important to avoid scheduling classes on national holidays or communicate expectations for your participants in order to avoid last minute cancellations or low class numbers. Speak the Language It’s a proven fact that people learn more effectively and retain more information when content is delivered in their native language. While working with a global audience, it’s important to avoid colloquial speak and slang terms or analogies familiar only to a particular region. Pop culture references can also be tricky. While many parts of the globe can understand and speak/write English, if you find a need for multiple sessions a year in a particular country or region you should consider translating your session to that region’s native language. This means translating not only the material, but also utilizing a native speaking facilitator and producer for those sessions as well. Following these five tips can help you manage and maintain a successful global vILT program. What about you? What strategies do you have for managing a global vILT program effectively?