Creating Learning Videos Using VideoScribe

May 24, 2017 10:00 by Dana Peters
We’ve all probably participated in a virtual instructor-led training (vILT) session where video clips were utilized. Either in a class-time activity, part of a pre-work assignment, or even embedded into marketing materials to promote the learning event. You might think those videos cost hundreds, even thousands of dollars, to create and require a team of career videographers to produce. In some cases, you are right, but today, I’d like to share with you a unique and inexpensive tool we’ve used to create whiteboard-style animation videos on a few instructional design projects. The tool is called VideoScribe. VideoScribe provides anybody, from experienced videographers to complete novices, the ability to create high-quality, whiteboard-style animation videos. Our designers have used the product to create learning videos for vILT courses but, for us, this tool has turned into what I call a “two for one”. Not only are we using it on instructional design projects, but we are also using it for our own marketing purposes as a creative way to communicate who we are and what we do. You can learn more about VideoScribe and how it is being used to communicate concepts, share ideas, and create awareness on their website. The client work we have done with the tool is confidential, but you can check out one of the promotional videos we developed to support our own company marketing efforts: The creative possibilities seem endless. What ways do you think you could utilize VideoScribe in your learning programs?  

Three Questions to Size-Up Learning Objectives for the Virtual Classroom

May 10, 2017 10:00 by Dana Peters
There are so many options when it comes to training delivery methods for your employee learning programs. How do you know when virtual instructor-led training (vILT) is the right fit?To help decide, you need to determine if vILT will meet some of your learning objectives. Notice I said some, not all. This is because usually one delivery method will not get the entire job done. It makes sense that you want your chosen delivery method to meet a healthy portion of your learning objectives, but a blended learning approach is probably going to be the most effective. A strategy that combines a blend of learning opportunities that work together to comprehensively meet all the learning objectives is often the recipe for success.But let’s get back to the question…how do you know if virtual instructor-led training is the right fit for some of your learning objectives?When working on learning design solutions for clients, we ask ourselves the following three questions to confirm whether or not vILT will meet each of the learning objectives. Do the learners need each other for learning to happen? Do the learners need to be in the same place, at the same time, to learn from each other? Will learners be able to demonstrate achievement of the stated learning objective in the virtual classroom? Let’s look at an easy example of these questions in action.Goal StatementBicycles are a popular mode of transportation in our community. The purpose of this course is to reduce accidents involving bikes by promoting the practice of bicycle safety amongst our bike riders.Learning ObjectivesBy the end of this course, participants should be able to: Explain the rules of the road Identify common bicycling hazards Determine ways to reduce the risk of crash, injury, or death Recommend appropriate safety gear Ride a bike safely Now let’s evaluate each of these objectives against our three questions. As you can see by our example: We answered “yes” to 8 out of the 15 questions (more than 50%). Only one of the learning objectives would be completely addressed exclusively through vILT. (#3 - Determine ways to reduce risk of crash, injury, or death.) Considering the learning goal statement, it is an important one. The response to “Will learners be able to demonstrate achievement of the stated learning objective in the virtual classroom?” is a “yes” on four out of the five learning objectives. Two out of the five learning objectives require learners to be in the same place, at the same time. All and all, this is a prime example of the need for a blended learning approach. vILT would be a viable option in combination with other pre-session and post session exercises, readings, knowledge checks, assignments, and partner work on the road. Hopefully, these three questions serve as yet another tool to help you evaluate the role the vILT plays in meeting your organization’s learning needs.

Design Matters: Graphic Design Tips for the Non-Designer

June 8, 2016 10:00 by Dana Peters
At this point, many of us are well aware of the benefits Virtual Instructor-Led Training (vILT) brings to organizations. The list includes cost savings, user convenience, extending reach to distant audiences, and faster deployment of new programs, just to name a few. The use of virtual learning technology also requires an elevated level of time and attention be given to the visual elements of all course content. While some Learning and Development teams are equipped to support this visual need with graphic design talent on staff; many are not. Many are forced to wear multiple skills hats to develop new courses from concept to delivery. Great outside resources are always wonderful to come across. Here is one I wanted to share.Tim Slade, an e-learning professional, author and speaker for Artisan E-Learning and E-Learning Uncovered, says good graphics are what brings your content to life. Design can be the difference between boring and memorable; the difference between a waste-of-time and beneficial. Slade recently published an article that outlines three basic graphic design principles that I feel provide an excellent outline for beginners and even non-designers. Slade discusses the importance of fonts, colors and the use of cohesive images, and graphics to enhance the quality of your content. He encourages practitioners to think about the information being presented, and decide what emotions are evoked. “Whether you realize it or not, you have an emotional response to different types of fonts,” Slade says in the post. “This emotional response either supports or contradicts the tone of your content.” Pairing different types of fonts for different pieces of content can also bring cohesiveness to the document and make things easier to understand and comprehend.  Slade recommends thinking about colors of your presentation in the same way. He outlines several ‘emotions’ that can be inferred from various color combinations including friendly and cheerful for orange or strong, dependable and trusting for blue. Strategic and proportional use of color and cohesive images can add a sense of personality to your documents as well, says Slade. Slade outlines several additional tips in his webinar recording found here. The virtual space provides many opportunities but it often requires those of us in this business to wear multiple hats- including sometimes the creative hat of a graphic designer. With practice, the right resources, and a little ambition we can all become more skilled at the art of design. Or at least enough to be dangerous.